How to Develop A Content Strategy For Your Projects

Hi all. I’ve decided to revive this blog for 2019, because I think it’s a good way to keep you all updated on what I’m doing. I also see it as a way to explain how I help people tell their stories and as a complement to my website. Besides, if I’m telling people that content is worth investing in, it’s a good idea to walk the walk. Thanks to all who supported the blog in the past, and I hope you’ll continue reading it in the months and years to come.

I’ve been doing lots of exciting things in recent months – an intellectual disability writing project, a stand-up comedy night, writing workshops, blogs for businesses and some newsletter editing.

Just before Christmas, I was approached by two different people who were working on two very different projects, but they had the same request of me. They needed help with structuring their thoughts and identifying exactly what they wanted to say. And for both clients, I wrote content strategy reports which would give them the clarity they were looking for.

The first person was writing a thesis and needed help structuring her arguments. She was a visual person, so words were a struggle. She had a brilliant hypothesis to explore and she knew what she wanted to say, but the words were locked in her head and she didn’t know how to order them on the page. The second person was setting up a new business and wanted to be able to summarise what she was offering for potential funders and future customers. She felt it would take her too long to do it herself.

Process for Developing Strategy

Though the projects were radically different, but the process I used for both clients was exactly the same. First, I arranged to meet them. This does involve an initial time investment, but talking to people face to face allows you to get to grips more quickly with what their projects are about. You’re establishing a relationship with them, so they feel they can talk to you more openly. This in turn makes it easier for you to decipher their message. I also recorded the meetings to make sure my reports would accurately reflect what they were trying to say.

I then used the information I gathered to create strategy documents that outlined a structure to follow. These reports pinpointed the central message of their projects as I saw it, and outlined the ways in which the clients could transmit their message. In the case of the thesis, the report gave advice on how to structure the arguments the client was making and how to divide the points she was making into chapters. I also gave tips on how to use language more effectively.

question-marks
Developing strategies to help people come up with bright ideas for their projects.

I am actually still writing the report for the business owner. The report will come in two parts. The first part will summarise what her business is about and how her products will benefit her customers. She can then use this information as the basis for all her content, for her business plan, her website and her promotional material. The second part will guide her on how to use that summarised information in her content. For example, I will show her how the different parts of the summary can be used to populate the pages of her website.

I cannot tell how successful these clients will be with their projects, but they are both determined, and I hope that my reports will play a small role in their success. These clients were mired deep in their projects and couldn’t think clearly, so I aimed to give them clarity of thought, to help them find their way through the maze and achieve their goals.

If you feel you’d benefit from a strategy that would help you structure your content, you can email me on derbhile@writewordseditorial.ie.

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